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Kim Tignor

Why Instagram Is No Rec Room (And How DJs Navigate Music Licenses and New Technology)

By Hip Hop, Music, Music Business No Comments

In 1973, Kool Herc invented hip hop—or, at least, gave it a huge shove forward—while DJing rec room parties in the Bronx. He played soul and funk records but focused on the breakdowns of each song. By blending, looping and extending the breaks, he created a whole new sound, a beat-driven type of music instantly recognizable, today, as hip hop.

Then, as now, hip hop was much more than a music genre, it was a cultural movement. The pillars of the movement were known as the five elements of hip hop: DJing, rapping, beatboxing, breakdancing, and graffiti. It was graffiti that introduced Kool Herc, after he emigrated from Jamaica, to the movement and to American culture at large. And, of course, the growing popularity of breakdancing is why he started extending breaks to begin with. Read More

This Year, Don’t Just Shop Small

By Advocacy, Small Business No Comments

During the height of the pandemic, all I wanted to do was get away from my neighborhood—and, yes, my neighbors—for a while. I’m sure others felt this way. I love where I live, but I spent so much time dreaming of getting out of there. A vacation would have been fantastic, but a day or two in the office would have done just fine too.

The funny thing is, when I finally got vaccinated and could travel a bit, I missed my neighborhood terribly. After returning home, that home sweet home feeling did not rush over me the minute I stepped in my front door, but, rather, when I went out to grab dinner for the family at our favorite local restaurant. Read More

For College Athletes, Rules Changes are no Substitute for Salaries

By Courts, Intellectual Property, NCAA, Sports No Comments

Fall is officially here and with it one of this country’s most beloved past times: college sports. There remain open debates on who suffered more during the cancelled seasons: college athletes or their fans. But in the midst of a global pandemic that shined a glaring light on systemic health and resource disparities, the future of our college athletes was under an additional layer of uncertainty. However, following a recent decision from the U.S. Supreme Court, some of that uncertainty has been resolved. Read More

More Humans, Fewer Algorithms

By Music, Music Business No Comments

Back in January, Spotify was granted a patent for technology so creepy that it sent a chill through the music industry that still hasn’t subsided. The company has been planning for years, apparently, to listen into our conversations and background noise in order to recommend us music. Spotify told the Patent Office their technology could obtain “content metadata [that] indicates an emotional state of the speaker,” and that once it has gathered enough so-called “emotion objects” it will use them to tailor what it plays next. The paragraph detailing Step 205 of the procedure seems to imply that making users happy is the goal, but then ends with a dire warning that, “Numerous other examples are possible.” Read More

The Future of Our Economy Depends on Creators of Color — And the Courts

By Courts, Creators, Legal No Comments

The opening months of the Biden Administration have left the Black community cautiously optimistic that the President will honor his commitment to the economic empowerment and security of Black people. However, we know that the next four years will be an exercise in holding this Administration accountable. They have made many promises, but few are as significant or as urgent as the need for progress against the enduring racist relics that continue to disenfranchise and destabilize historically marginalized communities. Black people must use our power to bring about systemic change and not settle for words or gestures during this moment of political opportunity. Read More